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Undergraduate Bulletin
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Music Courses (MUS)

Courses in the 500 and 600 groups may not be available every year. Please inquire at Music office for schedule. 600-level courses are not available for undergraduate students unless qualified for dual registration. 500-level courses are not available to freshmen and sophomores.

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate Students

500 Organ Pedagogy (3:3)

Pr. junior, senior, or graduate keyboard major or principal

A study and evaluation of procedures used in the teaching of organ. Emphasis on skills and techniques through exercises and literature. (Occ)

507 Modal Counterpoint (3:3)

Pr. 202 and 206 or permission of instructor

Contrapuntal techniques and standard forms of Renaissance sacred vocal repertoire. Analysis of music by such composers as Josquin, Palestrina, and Lassus. Standard writing techniques of motet and mass; aural training. (Spring)

508 Tonal Counterpoint (3:3)

Pr. 202 and 206 or permission of instructor

Contrapuntal techniques and standard forms of the middle and late Baroque. Analysis of music by composers from Corelli to Bach, composition in representative forms, and aural training. (Fall)

510 Advanced Tonal Analysis (3:3)

Pr. MUS 202 and 206 or graduate standing

Analysis of selected major compositions in the tonal repertoire. Reading and discussion of literature on theoretical concepts and on analysis and interpretation. (Spring)

511 History of Opera (3:3)

Pr. 333 or permission of instructor

Principal opera composers and styles from Monteverdi to the present; analytical study of selected major works. (Odd Spring)

513 Performance of Art Song Repertoire (1:0:2)

Pr. permission of instructor

May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

Performance-based study of art song repertoire emphasizing stylistic elements. Concentrates on one language or composer each semester, including, but not limited to, German Lieder, French Melodie, American or British song.

521 *Song Literature I (3:3)

Survey of non-operatic solo vocal repertoire: Italian (Baroque and Classical), German, Nationalistic, Spanish. Brief historical study of major composers, poets, compositional style, and historical periods. (Fall)

522 Song Literature II (3:3)

Survey of non-operatic solo vocal repertoire: Italian (Romantic and 20th Century), French, British, 20th-Century American. Brief historical study of major composers, poets, compositional style, and historical periods. (Fall)

525 Overview of Tonal Harmony and Form (3:3)

Pr. permission of instructor

Review of tonal harmony, voice-leading, and form. (Fall)

526 Overview of Western Music History (3:3)

Pr. permission of instructor

Review of western European music history from the Greeks to the present day including the classical art tradition in America. (Spring)

528 Choral Music since 1750 (3:3)

Pr. 333 or permission of instructor

Study of significant genres and major composers of choral music since 1750; detailed examination of selected masterworks. (Even Fall)

529 Music before 1600 (3:3)

Pr. MUS 332 or permission of instructor

Examines musical traditions before 1600 beyond the survey level. Topics may include gender/sexuality, geography, institutions, orality, performance practice, print/manuscript culture, and/or religion.

530 Music from 1600 to 1800 (3:3)

Pr. 332 or permission of instructor

Examines musical traditions ca. 1600–1800 beyond the survey level. Topics include performance practice, nationalism, gender and sexuality, religion, orality/notation, organology, and iconography.

531 Classicism and Romanticism in Music: 1750–1850 (3:3)

Pr. 333 or permission of instructor

Examination of major contributions of Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Berlioz, Schumann, etc., to western traditions. Special attention given to development of music for symphony orchestra and piano. (Odd Spring)

532 Music of the Nineteenth Century (3:3)

Pr. 333 or permission of instructor

Examines musical traditions ca. 1789–1914 beyond the survey level. Topics may include gender/sexuality, institutions, nationalism, nature, performance practice, and/or religion.

533 Music of the Twentieth Century (3:3)

Pr. 333 or permission of instructor

Examines musical traditions from ca. 1880 to the present beyond the survey level. Topics may include music and the State, gender/sexuality, ethnicity and identity, cultural policy/politics, religion, and/or multimedia.

534 Music Since 1945 (3:3)

Pr. 333 or permission of instructor

Study of creative trends and issues in music and related media in Europe and the United States since World War II. (Even Fall)

538 The Symphonic Tradition (3:3)

Pr. 332, 333 or permission of instructor

Advanced study of symphonic styles and techniques from Baroque era to present. (Even Spring)

541 Principles of Vocal Pedagogy (3:3)

Pr. senior or graduate standing as a voice major or principal or permission of instructor

Teaching process as applied to singing. Includes historical development and an examination and comparison of concepts and approaches past and present. (Fall)

550 *Electronic Music (3:2:2)

Introductory course in electronic composition. Lecture and laboratory experience. (Fall & Spring) (Same as MUS 350)

566 Orchestration (3:3)

Advanced techniques in instrumental scoring for large ensembles such as orchestra, wind ensemble, and jazz ensemble. Historical and stylistic analysis of the art of orchestration. Additional practical exercises in scoring and arranging for small and large ensembles. (Fall)

589 Experimental Course: Introduction to the Alexander Technique for Performing Musicians (3:3)

Pr. MUS 451 or above in performance studies

An active and scholarly exploration of the Alexander Technique as a means to unlocking creativity, discovering freedom and ease in performance, reducing stress and tension throughout the body, and preventing performance-related injuries. (Offered spring '10 and fall '10)

589A Experimental Course: Fundamentals of Instrumental Score Reading (2:1:2)

Pr. MUS 472 or 419 or permission of instructor

A laboratory course in which students will learn the principles of orchestral score reading and transposition through the systematic playing and singing of the seven clefs. (Offered fall '08)

*Open to all University students.

 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin for additional graduate-level courses.

This page was last updated on June 9, 2010.